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Absentee Ballot Information

Am I Eligible?

To receive an absentee ballot one of the following must be true:

  • You must be 60 years of age or older
  • Expect to be absent from the community in which you are registered for the entire time the polls are open on election day
  • Be physically unable to attend the polls without assistance from another
  • Unable to attend the polls because of the tenets of your religion.
  • Confined to jail awaiting arraignment or trial
  • Appointed an election inspector in a precinct other than the precinct where you reside

Requesting a Ballot

If you are a resident of the City of Kalamazoo, please fill out this form to have an absentee ballot application mailed to you or call us at 269-337-8793. An application must be received before a ballot can be mailed. If requesting within a couple of weeks of the election, please fax, e-mail, or mail this Absent Voter Ballot Application (.pdf) request to expedite the process. If you have any questions, please call or send an email to elections@kalamazoocity.org.

Ballots may also be picked up by the voter in person at the City Clerk's office in Room 104 of City Hall at 241 W South Street. Ballots cannot be given to anyone other than the voter. Voters will be asked to present a valid photo ID when obtaining an absentee ballot in person at the Clerk's office.  Anyone who does not have an acceptable form of photo ID or did not bring it with them can still vote.  They will be required to sign a brief affidavit stating that they are not in possession of photo ID.  Their ballot will be included with all others and counted on Election Day.

If you are not a City of Kalamazoo resident, please contact your local clerk for an absentee ballot. Remember a Kalamazoo address does not always indicate a City of Kalamazoo residence. Your voter identification card will list the jurisdiction of residence and contact information. If your jurisdiction is within Kalamazoo County, use the Kalamazoo County Officials Directory for contact information.

Important Deadlines

An absentee ballot may be requested 75 days prior to an election. Ballots may be requested by mail up until 2 p.m. on the Saturday prior to an election. Please note, that is rarely enough time to complete the process. Request your ballot as soon as possible.

The last day to obtain an absentee ballot in the office is the Monday prior by 4 p.m. The ballot must be voted in the office and returned. All ballots must be returned by 8 p.m. on Election Day to be counted.

Absentee ballot deadlines for the scheduled 2017 elections are:

2017       Elections Last Day to Request by Mail - 2 p.m. Last Day to Vote in the Office - 4 p.m. Last Day to Return for Counting - 8 p.m.
May 2 April 29 May 1 May 2
November 7 November 4 November 6 November 7

Completing the Ballot

Inside your ballot envelope will be the ballot and two envelopes.

  • Vote the ballot by completely filling in the oval to the right of the candidate's name.
  • Be sure to vote for only the number of candidates listed in the heading for that office. Some offices allow more than one candidate to be nominated.
  • Complete both sides of the ballot.
  • Making sure the ballot stub is shown, refold the ballot and place in the gray envelope.
  • Place the gray envelope into the manila envelope, seal and sign within the red box on the front of the manila envelope. The ballot will not count if the envelope is not signed!

Returning The Ballot

  • Ballots may be returned by postal mail or dropped off at the Clerk's office by the voter, an immediate family member, a person residing in the same household or an assistant of the clerk.
  • Ballots must be returned by 8 p.m. on Election Day.

Tips for mailing

  • Don't forget to sign!
  • Mail early! Ballots must be in the City Clerk's office by 8 p.m. Election Day.
  • Place a line through your address on the manila envelope. That helps the post office but also allows us to identify who's ballot has been returned.
  • One First-class stamp will deliver the ballot to us.

Permanent Absentee List

The City Clerk's office maintains a permanent absent voter application list. Voters on this list will automatically receive an application for every election. If you'd like to be placed on this list, fill out this form or call us at 269-337-8793.  If you have any questions, please call or send an email to elections@kalamazoocity.org.

Military Or Overseas Citizens

The State of Michigan allows Military and Overseas Citizens to vote using their last known registered address.

You may contact your commanding officer and receive a Federal Post Card Registration and Absentee Ballot Application (FPCA). If you are a citizen overseas you may contact your Consulate Office. Or visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program website.

Statistics

Absentee Statistics will be posted after ballots have been mailed.

FAQ's

I registered to vote using the mail-in form, can I vote absentee?

Under Michigan State election law you cannot vote your first election as a Michigan resident by absentee ballot if you used the mail-in form to register to vote and are under the age of 60. You must vote in person the first time you vote. Meaning you must vote at the polls on election day or obtain your absentee ballot in person at the City Clerk's office. After voting in person you may receive an absentee ballot by mail for future elections.

Can an absentee ballot be sent to a Post Office Box?

We can mail your absentee ballot to your Post Office Box, if the post office box is where you would normally receive your personal mail and you do not receive mail at your registration address. Your registration address is still necessary to complete the application.

I made a mistake on my absentee ballot, can I receive another absentee ballot?

If you spoil your ballot in any way, you can receive another absentee ballot. If there is plenty of time before the election. Simply return the ballot in the envelope provided. Instead of signing the envelope, write "SPOILED" in the signature box. Upon receipt, a new ballot will be issued. If time is running short, please call office at 269-337-8793 for further instruction.

Can you cast an absentee ballot on election day?

Normally you cannot vote an absentee ballot on election day. However, if an emergency has occurred, such as you have been hospitalized on election day, or sickness or death has occurred in your family which will not allow you to go to the polls, you may receive an emergency absentee ballot. You will need to contact our office if this has occurred.

Can I drop off my absentee ballot at my voting precinct?

No, you cannot drop off your absentee ballot at your voting precinct. You must bring your absentee ballot to the City Clerk's Office.

Can I vote at my voting precinct after I have voted an absentee ballot?

Only if you have not turned in your absentee ballot! To do so, you must take your absentee ballot to your voting precinct. The pollworker will then void your ballot, and allow you to vote in a normal manner.

I've recently moved from another State and am ineligible to vote in Michigan. Can I still vote?

It depends on the State but most will allow you to vote one last time if your move was within 60 days of the election. To verify this information with the State you formerly lived in, visit the Can I Vote? website by the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS) for contact information.

I've heard absentee ballots are only counted if the election is close, is that true?

No, all absentee ballots returned by 8 p.m. on Election Day are counted!

I'm a military and/or overseas resident, I've requested a ballot but am afraid there won't be time to receive it, vote it and have it back by Election Day. What can I do?

You should contact your commanding officer or US Consulate and vote a Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot (FWAB). This form allows the voter to write the candidate of his or her choice for any office or ballot initiative they would see on the official ballot. A military or overseas voter using the FWAB may write-in votes for any federal, state or local office, or proposal on the ballot.

Election Day Information

When Do I Vote?

Election Consolidation Laws went into effect in 2005, establishing three potential election dates each year. Those dates are the fourth Tuesday in February and the first Tuesday after the first Monday in May, August, and November.

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Election dates for 2017 are:

  • Tuesday, May 2, 2017
  • Tuesday, November 7, 2017

I'll Be Absent...

If you'll be absent from the community you can request an absentee ballot up until the day before the election. Use the Absentee Ballot page for more information.

Am I Registered?

The Michigan Voter Information Center is very useful in identifying if you are a registered voter. The site will also provide helpful information such as precinct locations and maps, a listing of candidates on the ballot, and a calendar of important election dates.

If you find you are not registered, please visit the voter Registration Information page for more information.

Where Do I Vote?

All voters are assigned a precinct at the time of registration. That precinct location can be found on the voter identification card (see example below). A voter must vote at the precinct assigned to him or her. The ballot provided at that precinct will have all of the representatives of their residence displayed.

 ID-Card

If you have misplaced your voter identification card. The Michigan Voter Information Center will provide polling location information. The site will also provide helpful information such as maps, a listing of candidates on the ballot, and a calendar of important election dates. A voter identification card is not required at the polls. It's provided simply as reference.

For a map of your precinct or directions, please visit the District & Precinct Information page for more information. 

What's on the Ballot?

The Michigan Voter Information Center at www.michigan.gov/vote allows you to search for ballot information by jurisdiction and view your sample ballot after searching for your voter registration information. 

How do I Vote?

The City of Kalamazoo uses the M-100 optical scan voting system from Election Systems and Software (ES&S). This system provides a paper trail by providing a paper ballot that a voter completes by filling in ovals. The ballot is then placed into an electronic scanner that tabulates the votes. The paper ballot is retained as a back-up to the electronic tabulation. 

I Need Assistance...

Voters requiring assistance may vote independently by using the AutoMARK ballot marking device. This device is a printer that will mark the voter's ballot after they've made their selections using a touch screen. The device assists voters with mobility, vision, and literacy difficulties. 

Voters may also request assistance from the person of their choice. However, that person may not be the voter's employer or agent of that employer or an officer or agent of a union to which the voter belongs. Two precinct inspectors may also assist the voter.

What Are My Rights?

Michigan Voter Rights and Responsibilities

R I G H T S

As a Michigan voter, you have the right to:

  • Be treated with courtesy and respect by the election workers.
  • Vote in private free from interference or intimidation.
  • Review a sample ballot before voting.
  • Review a summary of the state and federal laws which govern voting.
  • Ask for and receive help from the election workers if you are unsure about anything related to casting a ballot.
  • Obtain a replacement ballot if you make a mistake when voting.
  • Obtain an absentee ballot if you are qualified to vote absentee.
  • Vote a provisional ballot if your name does not appear on the registration list and you assert, under oath, that 1) you registered to vote by the registration deadline and 2) you are a resident of the city or township where you are offering to vote.
  • Have your minor child (under age 18) accompany you in the voting station while you vote.
  • Obtain a ballot if in line when the polls close at 8 p.m.
  • Report illegal or fraudulent activity to the local clerk or the Michigan Department of State's Bureau of Elections.

 

R E S P O N S I B I L I T I E S

As a Michigan voter, you have a responsibility to:

  • Treat the election workers and other voters with courtesy and respect.
  • Respect the privacy and voting rights of other voters.
  • Request instructions or assistance as needed if you do not know how to use the voting equipment or have other questions about casting a ballot.
  • Be informed about the candidates and proposals on the ballot.
  • Check your ballot to ensure that it accurately reflects your choices.
  • Read and follow all voting instructions.
  • Register at least 30 days before the election.
  • Keep your voter registration information up-to-date with your current address.
  • Follow all federal and state voting laws.
  • Vote in person if you:
  1. Registered by mail, and
  2. have never previously voted in Michigan. (Does not apply to voters who are age 60 or older, disabled or overseas.)
  • Provide identification before voting if you:
  1. Registered by mail,
  2. have never previously voted in Michigan, and
  3. have not already satisfied the identification requirement. (Acceptable ID includes a current and valid photo ID or a paycheck stub, utility bill, bank statement or government document that lists your name and address. Requirement does not apply to voters who are disabled or overseas.)
  • Refrain from campaigning or influencing voters in the polling place.

FAQ's

I've recently moved from another State and am ineligible to vote in Michigan. Can I still vote?

It depends on the State but most will allow you to vote one last time if your move was within 60 days of the election. To verify this information with the State you formerly lived in, visit the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS) website for contact information.

Photo Id at the Polls

The Michigan Supreme Court ruled on July 18, 2007 that a provision of Michigan election law which requires voters to either present picture identification or sign an affidavit if they do not have picture identification with them is constitutional and enforceable. (See MCL 168.523 for picture identification requirement.) While this requirement was originally enacted by the State Legislature in 1996, the requirement was never implemented due to a prior ruling issued through the Attorney General's office.

Overview

Precinct election workers are required to ask for photo identification at the polls. The following are acceptable forms of photo identification assuming they are current and a picture is provided:

  • Michigan Driver's License or Personal ID
  • Non-Michigan Driver's License or Personal ID
  • Federal or state government-issued ID
  • U.S. passport
  • Military ID
  • Student ID - high school or accredited institution of higher education
  • Tribal ID card

If no photo ID is available, that voter may sign an affidavit attesting that he or she is not in possession of a photo ID and vote a regular ballot.

FAQ's

How is the picture identification requirement implemented?

The election inspector responsible for implementing the requirement will ask each voter who completes and Application to Vote to show picture identification. If the voter states that he or she does not have picture identification, the election inspector will give the voter an affidavit to sign attesting that he or she is not in possession of picture identification. A ballot cannot be issued to the voter unless the voter displays picture identification or signs the affidavit.

What type of check is the election inspector required to perform when viewing a voter's picture identification?

The election inspector will check the photo and name appearing on the identification to verify the voter's identity. As a part of this check, the election inspector will confirm that the name appearing on the picture identification matches the name entered by the voter on the Application to Vote.

Does the name appearing on the picture identification have to exactly match the name entered by the voter on the Application to Vote or the manner in which the voter's name appears on the precinct's QVF List?

No-however, the names must be similar enough to verify the voter's identity. For example, commonly used abbreviated names are acceptable such as Bill for William, Kathy for Kathryn. Initials that are representative of the voter's first name are also acceptable.

What types of identification can voters display to satisfy the requirement?

Voters can satisfy the picture identification requirement by showing a Michigan Driver's License or a Michigan personal identification card. Voters who do not possess either document may show any of the following forms of picture identification as long as they are current:

  • Driver's license or personal identification card issued by another state.
  • Federal or state government-issued photo identification.
  • U.S. passport.
  • Military identification card with photo.
  • Student identification with photo - from a high school or an accredited institution of higher education.
  • Tribal identification card with photo.

What actions should an election inspector take if the photo appearing on the picture identification displayed by a voter does not resemble the voter closely enough to verify the voter's identity?

As a first step, the election inspector should take into account the age of the photo and any explanations the voter may wish to offer (weight gain or loss, hair style or facial hair alterations, different eyeglass frames, etc.). If such considerations resolve the matter, the election inspector should issue a ballot to the voter. If questions over the voter's identity remain, the election inspector should ask to view any other acceptable forms of picture identification that the voter may have in his or her possession. If the matter cannot be resolved with a second piece of picture identification or the voter is unable to produce a second piece of picture identification, the election inspector should issue a provisional ballot to the voter and contact the clerk.

Does the identification displayed by the voter have to show the voter's residential address?

No. A picture identification card that does not show the voter's residential address is acceptable.

What happens if a voter offering to vote states that he or she has picture identification - but did not bring it to the polls?

Such voters can vote by signing the affidavit form. The affidavit can be used by:

  1. Voters who do not have acceptable picture identification, and
  2. Voters who have picture identification - but do not bring it to the polls.

What happens to the affidavit forms which are completed and submitted by voters?

The completed affidavit forms must be secured by the precinct board and forwarded to the clerk after the polls close. The clerk must retain the completed affidavit forms for a period of two years.

Are there any other records associated with the picture identification requirement that the precinct board needs to create or maintain?

No. Other than maintaining the affidavit forms completed by voters who do not possess picture identification, there are not other records associated with the picture identification requirement that the precinct board is required to create of maintain.

Can a challenger or an election inspector challenge a voter just because he or she does not have picture identification or did not bring it to the polls and signs an affidavit?

No. A voter cannot be challenged just because he or she is not in possession of picture identification or did not bring picture identification to the polls and signs the affidavit in order to vote. Of course, as is the case with any voter, a voter who is unable to show picture identification can be challenged if a challenger or an election inspector has "good reason to believe" that the person is not qualified to vote in the precinct.

Under what circumstances can a challenge related to the picture identification requirement be issued?

As a challenger may challenge election procedures that are not being properly performed, a challenge may be made if an election inspector attempts to issue a ballot to a voter who has not shown picture identification or signed an affidavit. Also, a challenger may challenge the ballot of a voter if the challenger has "good reason to believe" the person is not properly registered. Consequently, a challenge may be issued if a voter provides picture identification with an address that is different than the address on the precinct's QVF list.

Does the picture identification requirement impact the absentee voting process in any way?

Yes. As of March 28, 2013 voters obtaining an absentee ballot in person will be asked to present photo identification or sign the Affidavit of Voter Not in Possession of Picture Identification form. 

What actions should a precinct board take if a voter who does not possess picture identification refuses to sign the affidavit form? Would such a voter be eligible to receive a provisional ballot?

A voter not in possession of picture identification who refuses to sign the affidavit form cannot vote and should be referred to the local clerk. This is the same procedure used for voters who refuse to complete an Application to Vote: no ballot is issued. Such a voter would not be eligible for a provisional ballot.

What actions should a precinct board take if a voter claims to have picture identification but refuses to show it? Should such a voter be offered the opportunity to sign the affidavit form? Would such a voter be eligible to receive a provisional ballot?

A voter who claims to have picture identification but refuses to show it cannot vote and should be referred to the local clerk. The voter does not have the option of signing the affidavit form as the affidavit is designed for voters not in possession of picture identification. Such a voter would not be eligible for a provisional ballot.

Does picture identification have to be requested in an instance where the voter is well known to the election inspector handling the picture identification requirement?

Yes. The consistent application of the picture identification requirement is important to avoid any appearance that the requirement is being selectively enforced. In addition, the law makes no exceptions for such situations.

Does a voter well known to the election inspector handling the picture identification requirement have to sign the affidavit if the voter is not in possession of picture identification?

Yes. As noted above, any practice which would make it appear that the picture identification requirement is being selectively enforced must be avoided. Also, the law makes no exceptions for such situations.

How does the picture identification requirement impact the federal identification requirement imposed under the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) on new Michigan voters who register to vote by mail?

If a voter subject to the federal identification requirement did not meet the requirement when registering to vote, the voter must present one of the following documents before voting in the first election in which he or she wishes to participate: 1) an acceptable form of picture identification or 2) a paycheck, government check, utility bill, bank statement or a government document which lists the voter's name and address.

Given the above, the three situations could emerge when a voter is subject to the federal identification requirement:

  1. Voter displays picture identification: Satisfies both he federal identification requirement and Michigan's new picture identification requirement.
  2. Voter displays paycheck, government check, utility bill, bank statement or a government document, which lists his or her name and address:
  3. Satisfies the federal identification requirement. Voter must display picture identification to satisfy Michigan's picture identification requirement. If a voter does not possess picture identification he or she must sign the affidavit form developed for voters who do not possess identification before voting.
  4. Voter does not possess picture identification and is unable to produce a paycheck government check, utility bill, bank statement or a government document which lists his or her name and address:
  • Voter must sign affidavit form developed for voters who do not possess picture identification before voting.
  • As the voter is unable to satisfy the federal identification requirement, the voter must be issued a provisional ballot as provided under the current procedure.
  • The required provisional balloting notices must be given to the voter with the ballot.
  • After the voter has completed the voting process, the provisional ballot must be secured as an "envelope" ballot.
  • The voter is then extended a 6-day period to satisfy the federal identification requirement.
  • If the voter fails to satisfy the federal identification requirement during the 6-day period, the ballot is not counted.

Registration Information

Am I Registered?

The Michigan Voter Information Center is very useful in identifying if you are a registered voter. The site will also provide helpful information such as precinct locations and maps and a calendar of important election dates.

How Do I Register?

To register to vote you must be:

  • a U.S. citizen;
  • at least 18 years of age by election day;
  • a resident of Michigan and the city or township where you are applying to register to vote.

The following is a listing of voter registration locations:

Kalamazoo County Clerk Kalamazoo City Clerk Secretary of State Branch
201 W Kalamazoo Ave. 241 W. South St. Rm 104 3298 Stadium Drive
(269) 383-8840 (269) 337-8793 (888) 767-6424
Map It! Map It! Map It!

 

Voter registration (.pdf) may also be completed by mail. Please note there are special provisions for voters who register by mail. A mail registrant will be required to vote in person the first time if he or she has not previously voted in the State of Michigan.

In addition, the following State agencies offer voter registration services to their clients: Department of Human Services, the Department of Community Health and the Department of Career Development. Military recruitment centers also provide voter registration services.

Please note: 

  • When registering in person, voters must present identification or sign an affidavit stating they do not have identification with them.
  • Your voter registration address must match your driver's license address.
  • If you register by mail or anywhere other than the Secretary of State branch office, your address on your driver's license will be changed as well.
  • A sticker with your new address will be mailed to you for the back of your driver's license.

Important Deadlines

One can register at any time but in order to be eligible for an election, registration must be completed at least 30 days prior to the election. The registration deadlines for the 2017 elections are:

  • Monday, April 3, 2017 for the May 2, 2017 May Consolidated Election
  • Tuesday, October 10, 2017 for the November 7, 2017 Municipal Election

Statistics

Registration Statistics are updated as of March 9, 2017. The numbers are broken down by Gender and Age.

pdf  Current Voter Registration Numbers

FAQ's

I've misplaced my voter identification card, do I need it on Election Day?

No. Your voter identification card only serves as your reference. It lists your polling location and provides district information. You do not need your voter identification at the polls. However, you should bring photo identification at the polls if you have it.

What if I have a felony?

Felons have voting rights in Michigan as long as their sentence has been completed. Please refer to the information above to register to vote.

I've recently moved from another State and am ineligible to vote in Michigan. Can I still vote?

It depends on the State but most will allow you to vote one last time if your move was within 60 days of the election. To verify this information with the State you formerly lived in, visit the Can I Vote? website by the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS) for contact information.

I'll be 18 after the close of registration. I want to vote, what do I do?

Michigan allows you to register when you are 17-1/2. Be sure to register before the close of registration. As soon as you turn 18, you'll be able to vote in any election.

Student Section

Registration

Registration information can be found on the voter Registration Information page.

As a student the State of Michigan allows you to register to vote at your permanent address (a parent's address, for example) or at your school address. However, you should know that registering to vote will change the address found on your driver's license. Likewise, if you change the address on your driver's license the address of your voter registration will be changed to match. Please take this into consideration when you are presented with an opportunity to fill out a voter registration form or when you go to the Secretary of State's Office to renew your license.

Election Day

You've already taken the first step in being an informed voter, simply by visiting this page. Your age group was the second largest (61.65%!) to vote in the 2016 Presidential election within the City of Kalamazoo. That's surprising because everyone knows students don't vote, right? The downfall is all of the other elections, only 2.73% of student age population voted in the 2016 August Primary and 8.04% in the 2014 November Gubernatorial elections. Voting is simple, you just have to make a little time to get to the polls. So what do you need to know?

  1. Be registered!
  2. Know when to vote - polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.
  3. Know where to vote - your polling location is printed on your voter identification card or find it by visiting the Michigan Voter Information Center.
  4. Know how to get there - Visit the District and Precinct page for precinct maps and directions.
  5. Know how to vote - If you've completed a standardized test and we all know you have, then you know how to vote! For a little more confidence, click here to watch a short video on video  How to Vote .
  6. Take a look at your ballot and know who and what you want to vote for before you go. There's much more than just the President on the ballot.
  7. And finally, tell your friends! If you live in the same complex, you vote in the same location (provided they are registered!), carpool, grab the same bus, whatever, let your student voice be heard!

Visit the Election Day Information page for more information.

Absentee Ballot Information

So you want to vote? But you're registered at home and not in Kalamazoo? No problem! You can request an absentee ballot from your home Clerk. Requesting an absentee ballot is as easy as 1, 2, 3... and 4 but that's it, we promise! If "home" isn't in Michigan, use the Long Distance Voter website to find the rules for your State. If "home" is in Michigan read on.

The short:

  1. Call your Clerk and ask for an application.
  2. Receive your application, complete it and send it back.
  3. Receive your ballot, vote it and send it back.
  4. Sleep-in on Election Day because you've already voted!

The long:

  1. Sounds easy enough? If only you knew who your Clerk was, right? You don't know what Township or City you live in either? What is a Clerk? Don't worry, we won't go into the specifics of what or who a Clerk is but we will tell you how to find that information. If you are registered in Michigan, your voter identification card will have your Clerk's information on it. For those of you that didn't realize you should keep that card... your solution is the Michigan Voter Information Center, which will provide you with everything from what township you live in, to who your Clerk is and how to contact him or her. If "home" is the City of Kalamazoo, visit the Absentee Ballot Information page for more information.
  2. Step 1's done, now what? You'll receive an application in the mail. The form looks complicated but don't let it intimidate you! There are two things you have to do. One is check a reason (most likely that will be "I expect to be absent from the community in which I am registered...") and two is sign! If your Clerk mailed the application to your school address, you are done, just mail it back. If it wasn't mailed to your school address and that's where you want the ballot mailed, be sure to write your school address in the "Send Election Ballot To:" box below your signature.
  3. This is the important part. Vote your ballot! You know those great Scantron type tests you take? The one's that make it easier for your professor to grade 200+ tests from one class? That's what the ballot is like. It makes it easier for election officials to tabulate thousands of votes too! Simply fill in the bubble or connect the arrow next to your candidates name. Make sure you only vote for the number of candidates allowed (it tells you that number on the ballot). After you've made all of your selections, put the ballot back in the secrecy sleeve, and into the return envelope. Seal the envelope and SIGN IT. The hard part will be finding a stamp and getting it to the mailbox. Isn't there just a way to vote online? Nope, can't make it too easy!
  4. Do we really have to tell you how to do that?

District & Precinct Information

A Kalamazoo address, does not always mean a Kalamazoo City resident. Check your voter ID card, you may be registered in Kalamazoo Township or Oshtemo Township!

More information can be found on the District & Precinct Information page.

Calendar

Important voter deadlines can be found on the Election Calendar page.

Get Involved!

There are multiple ways you can be involved in the elections. Our personal favorite is becoming a pollworker. If you're registered in Kalamazoo County, we need you! We even pay you! How great is that? You're performing valuable community service and civic duty and we'll pay you $135 for helping us out. Complete and print a  pdf  Pollworker Application  and send it to us.

Student Political Organizations

  Western Michigan University   Kalamazoo College
  Student Democrats   Student Democrats
  Student Republicans   Student Republicans
  Student Libertarian Party  

FAQ's

I'm attending college in Kalamazoo but my parent's residence is out of State, can I register here?

Yes! Michigan allows students to choose either their parent's residence or their college residence for voting purposes. If you'd prefer to vote for representatives that represent your school, register here. If you're more comfortable electing officials "back home" you can register there. The choice is yours!

I registered to vote by mail, can I still vote absentee?

Michigan law requires a voter to verify their identity prior to voting. If you registered by mail, you haven't verified your identity with anyone. In order to vote absentee, you'll need to pick the ballot up in person at your Clerk's office or re-register in person. Re-registering can be done at any of the voter registration locations found on the Registration Information page. Please note: Clerk's are required to be open from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. the Saturday prior to the election. Call your Clerk to verify other office hours before you go.

There's power in numbers, right? So my one vote doesn't really matter if other students aren't voting, right?

Wrong! For all of those that think that way, the polls would be flooded on election day and votes would change ten-fold. Now that might not happen but here are a few recent examples where your one vote could have made a difference:

  • In 1997, Vermont State representative Sydney Nixon was seated as an apparent one vote winner, 570 to 569. Mr Nixon resigned when the State House determined, after a recount, that he had actually lost to his opponent Robert Emond 572 to 571.
  • In 1997, South Dakota Democrat John McIntyre led Republican Hal Wick 4,195 to 4,191 for the second seat in Legislative District 12 on election night. A subsequent recount showed Wick the winner at 4,192 to 4,191. The State Supreme Court however, ruled that one ballot counted for Wick was invalid due to an overvote. This left the race a tie. After hearing arguments from both sides, the State Legislature voted to seat wick 46 to 20.
  • In 1994, Republican Randall Luthi and Independent Larry Call tied for a seat in the Wyoming House of Representatives from the Jackson Hole area with 1,941 votes each. A recount produced the same result. Mr. Luthi was finally declared the winner when, in a drawing before the State Canvassing Board, a ping pong ball bearing his name was pulled from the cowboy hat of Democratic Governor Mike Sullivan.
  • In 1989, a Lansing, Michigan School District millage proposition failed when the final recount produced a tie vote 5,147 for, and 5,147 against. On the original vote count, votes against the proposition were ten more than those in favor. The result meant that the school district had to reduce its budget by $2.5 million.

Other Offices

Federal or State office which represents a district that extends beyond a single county, Appeals Court Judge, Circuit Court Judge, District Court Judge, & Probate District Judge - Michigan Secretary of State's Office

Federal or State office which represents a district that does not extend beyond a single county, Probate Judge, County Office, District Library Board - Kalamazoo County Clerk

Candidates for county convention delegate (precinct delegate)

  • TBA -File Affidavit of Identity for the August 7, 2018 primary with the Kalamazoo County Clerk
    • TBA-Last day for a precinct delegate candidate to file withdraw for the August 7, 2018 primary
  • TBA- Write-in candidates for precinct delegate positions file Declaration of Intent form for the August 7, 2018 primary with the City Clerk
    • As an alternative, candidates for precinct delegate may file a Declaration of Intent form on election day (August 7, 2018) before the close of the polls.

School Board

Qualifications

Members of the Kalamazoo Public School Board of Trustees must be qualified electors of the School District.

For a current member list and/or calendar visit the Kalamazoo Public Schools site.

Nominations

Members of the Kalamazoo Public School Board of Trustees must file nominating petitions with the City Clerk. There are two ways to file:

  1. Submit petitions with at least 40 but not more than 100 signatures of registered voters within the School District
  2. Submit a $100 nonrefundable filing fee

Procedure

Important Dates

For the November 6, 2018 General Election

  • TBA- Nomination petitions or filing fee and Affidavits of Identity due
    • TBA - Last day for candidate to withdraw

Library Board

Qualifications

Members of the Kalamazoo Public Library Board of Trustees must be qualified electors of the Library District.

For a current member list and/or calendar visit the Kalamazoo Public Library's site.

Nominations

Members of the Kalamazoo Public Library Board of Trustees must file nominating petitions with the City Clerk. There are two ways to file:

  1. Submit petitions with at least 40 but not more than 100 signatures of registered voters within the School District.
  2. Submit a $100 nonrefundable filing fee.

Procedure

  • Submit completed petitions or $100 nonrefundable filing fee to the Kalamazoo City Clerk: and
  • Submit the form for Affidavit of Identity (.pdf).

Important Dates

For the November 6, 2018 General Election:

  • TBA - Nomination petitions or filing fee and Affidavits of Identity due
    • TBA - Last day for candidate to withdraw

Running for Office

City Commission

In November 2014 voters approved five amendments to the Kalamazoo City Charter that change the way citizens fill positions on the City Commission.  Below is an explanation of the changes.

The Changes

Beginning with the November 3, 2015 Municipal Election, citizens will elect a Mayor and six City Commissioners. 

  • Regular municipal elections will continue to be held in November of each odd-numbered year.
  • The Mayor will be elected on a separate ticket for a two-year term.
  • City Commissioners will be elected to four-year terms.  These terms will be staggered, with three Commissioners elected every two years.
  • The City Commissioner candidate who receives the most votes at each regular municipal election will be the Vice Mayor.  This means the Vice Mayorship will change every two years.  The Vice Mayor will serve the first two years of his/her term as the Vice Mayor and the last two years as a City Commissioner.

2015 A Transition Year

The 2015 Municipal Election will be unique as the City Commission transitions to staggered, four-year terms.

  •  In 2015 voters will elect six City Commissioners.
  • The Commissioner candidates who finish 1st, 2nd, and 3rd will be elected to four-year terms (expiring in 2019).
  • The candidates who finish 4th, 5th, and 6th will be elected to two-year terms (expiring in 2017).
  •  Beginning in 2017, and at each municipal election thereafter, voters will elect three Commissioners to four-year terms.  

Qualifications - per City Charter

§6. (a) A person seeking the office of City Commissioner shall be a resident of and qualified elector in the City at the time of filing for election or appointment to that office. The City Commission shall be judge of the election and qualification of its own members, subject to review by the Courts. No member of the city Commission shall, during his or her term of office, hold any other city office unless otherwise provided in this Charter.

(b) No member of the City Commission, or other officer, shall be interested directly or indirectly in the profits of any contract, job or work, or be financially interested directly or indirectly in the sale to the city of any land, materials, supplies or services (other than official services). Any member of the City Commission, or other officer of the city, offending against the provisions of this section shall, upon conviction thereof, be fined not more than Five Hundred ($500.00) Dollars, or be imprisoned not more than ninety days, or both, in the discretion of the court and shall forfeit office. The prohibitions of this section shall not apply if the City Commission shall declare on its records by a unanimous vote of the members thereof, other than the member so interested, that the best interests of the city are served in spite of a personal interest, direct or indirect.

Nominations - per City Charter

§32. (a) Candidates for all elective offices in the City shall be nominated from the city at large by petitions only. The name of any elector of the city shall be printed on the ballot whenever a petition, as hereinafter prescribed, shall have been filed in his or her behalf with the City Clerk. The City Clerk shall provide uniform nominating petition blanks.

(b) Each petition shall contain the name of the candidate along with the address of his or her residence and shall specify the office for which the candidate is nominated. Each elector signing such petition shall add to his or her signature the address of his or her residence and the date on which he or she signed. Each elector may sign the nominating petition of no more than seven candidates for City Commission. The signatures to the nominating petition need not all be appended to one paper, but to each separate paper there shall be attached an affidavit of the circulator thereof stating that each signature appended thereto was made in the circulator's presence and is the genuine signature of the person whose name it purports to be.

(c) Each nominating petition to be valid shall contain the names of not less than fifty nor more than seventy-five qualified electors.

On March 31, 2010, PA 44 of 2010 was signed into law. This change requires the City Commission candidate filing calendar to follow the same time line as other offices throughout the State.

Procedure

  • Submit properly completed petitions containing at least 50 valid signatures but no more than 75; and
  • Submit a completed Affidavit of Identity to the Clerk's office.

Important Dates

For the November 7, 2017 Municipal Election: 

  • No petition shall be circulated before Friday, May 26, 2017 
  • Tuesday, July 25, 2017 by 4:00 p.m. -Nomination petitions and Affidavit of Identty due to the City Clerk's Office
    • July 28, 2017 by 4:00 p.m. -Last day for a candidate to withdraw

Library Board  |  School Board  |  Other Offices

 

Election Statistics

Voter Turnout

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

 

Current Registration Statistics

Registration Statistics are updated as of March 9, 2017. The numbers are broken down by Gender and Age.

Turnout Analysis

The file provided is an analysis of voter turnout from 1992-2001. Please note, some of the precinct boundaries have changed since that time period.

District & Precinct Information

City Precinct Map

An interactive precinct map can be found on the City's GIS site. When in the mapping system, click on Map Layers, select Voting Precincts and select Refresh to view. In addition, a you can view a  pdf  Citywide Precinct Map .

Directions to Each Precinct

The table below provides direction maps for each individual polling location. By clicking on "Get directions" and adding an address in the appropriate box, directions will be provided to the polling location.

 Pct 01  Pct 02  Pct 03  Pct 04  Pct 05
 Pct 06  Pct 07  Pct 08  Pct 09  Pct 10
 Pct 11  Pct 12  Pct 13  Pct 14  Pct 15
 Pct 16  Pct 17  Pct 18  Pct 19  Pct 20
 Pct 21  Pct 22  Pct 23  Pct 24  Pct 25
 Pct 26  Pct 27      

Individual Precinct Maps

The table below provides maps (.pdf) of each individual precincts boundaries.

pdf  Pct 01 pdf  Pct 02 pdf  Pct 03 pdf  Pct 04 pdf  Pct 05
pdf  Pct 06 pdf  Pct 07 pdf  Pct 08 pdf  Pct 09 pdf  Pct 10
pdf  Pct 11 pdf  Pct 12 pdf  Pct 13 pdf  Pct 14   pdf Pct 15
pdf  Pct 16 pdf  Pct 17 pdf  Pct 18 pdf  Pct 19 pdf  Pct 20
pdf  Pct 21 pdf  Pct 22 pdf  Pct 23 pdf  Pct 24 pdf  Pct 25
pdf  Pct 26 pdf  Pct 27    

County Commission District Maps

The table below provides maps (.pdf) of each County Commission district. Districts highlighted in gray, represent the City of Kalamazoo.

 District 01  District 02  District 03
 District 04  District 05  District 06
 District 07  District 08  District 09
 District 10  District 11  

Legislative District Maps 

pdf  Congressional District 6 Map

pdf  State Senate District 20 Map

pdf  State House District 60 Map

Polling Location Listing

Use the pdf  Street Guide (52 KB)  to locate the precinct for each street within the City of Kalamazoo.

FAQ's

How often do the City's precincts change?

City precinct boundaries change infrequently. However, every 10 years District lines are redrawn in Congress and at the State level. The City of Kalamazoo is required to adjust precinct lines accordingly.

How many voters are allowed per precinct?

Under State law, precincts are not allowed more than 2,999 voters.

Become a Pollworker

Becoming a pollworker is the perfect way to get involved! The City of Kalamazoo employs 150-300 poll workers depending on the election. We're always recruiting new workers. As technology increases within the polls, a stronger need for voters familiar with those processes arises. Serving as a pollworker is a great way to fulfill civic duty!

Poll workers are required to be registered voters within the State of Michigan and are paid $115 for the day (6 a.m. until 9 or 10 p.m.). Tell your friends and become a poll worker today!

Simply submit the pdf  Pollworker Application  to the City Clerk's Office.

Political Parties:

The State of Michigan recognizes 6 political parties. In alphabetical order, those parties are:

democrat logo                      greenparty logo                   libertyparty logo     

 Democratic Party                  Green Party                        Libertarian Party      

naturallaw logo                     republican logo                   taxpayer logo

Natural Law Party               Republican Party               U.S. Taxpayer's Party

 

 

 

 

 

 

Initiative, Referendum, and Recall Information

The following is a copy of the City Charter as it pertains to Initiative, Referendum, and Recall:

Initiative - Requirements of Petition

§ 58. Any proposed ordinance may be submitted to the City Commission by petition filed with the city Clerk and signed by registered voters of the city in number of not less than fifteen percent (15%) of the number of total valid ballots cast for Commissioners at the last preceding regular election and verified by the person or persons who obtained the signatures thereto. Such verifications shall state that said signatures were obtained by the person or persons verifying the same, that the said signatures are the genuine signatures of the persons purporting to sign the same, and that the person of persons verifying such petition believed that the signers thereof are fully qualified and registered electors of the city. Said petitions shall give the residence of each of said electors signing the same by street and number, precinct and the date of signing the same. Such initiatory petition shall contain said proposed ordinance in full and a request that if sad proposed ordinance be not passed by the City Commission, the same shall be submitted to a vote of the electors. Said petition shall also contain any existing ordinance which would be altered or abrogated thereby.

Duty of City Clerk and City Commission

§ 59. Upon filing said petition, the City Clerk shall at once ascertain and certify its number of qualified signers. If such certificate shows the required number of qualified signers, the City Commission within twenty (20) days thereafter shall either enact said proposed ordinance without alteration or submit the proposed ordinance to the electors as hereinafter provided.
If such ordinance shall be enacted by the City Commission, it shall be subject to the regulations and restrictions upon the manner of the enactment as though it had originated in the City Commission. Submission to a Vote.
§ 60. If the City Commission shall determine not to enact an ordinance proposed by initiatory petition, it shall by resolution provide for its submission unamended to the electors and shall fix the time for the submission thereof and shall call a special election for that purpose not later than three months thereafter unless a general election or a special election for another purpose is to be held in six months. In such case, if a special election has not been called to vote upon such ordinance, the same shall be submitted at the first regular election thereafter. At such election all registered voters having the qualifications of electors shall be entitled to vote. If a majority of the electors voting on the question vote in favor of the proposed ordinance, it shall go into effect upon the proper publication or notice as provided in § 14 of this Charter.

Conflicting Ordinances - Which to Prevail

§ 61. If the provisions of two or more ordinances, both of which were adopted or approved by the electors at the same election, whether by initiatory provision or referendum as provided in this Charter, be inconsistent, then the ordinance receiving the lesser affirmative votes shall be of no force or effect so far as it or any of its provisions are inconsistent with the other ordinance or ordinances adopted or approved.

Manner of Recalling or Amending

§ 62. An ordinance proposed by petition and adopted by a vote of the electors as herein provided shall not be recalled or amended except by a majority vote of the electors voting thereon at an election called and held under the provisions of the City Charter.

Referendum - Requirements of Petition for

§ 63. If within twenty days from time of enactment of any ordinance other than emergency measures by the City Commission, or if at any time before the same shall have been published or posted and due notice of enactment given as provided in § 14 of this Charter, a petitions shall be filed with the City Clerk protesting against such ordinance taking effect and signed by registered voters of the city in number of not less than fifteen percent (15%) of the number of total valid ballots cast for Commissioners at the last preceding regular election and verified as required in § 33 of this Charter and certified by the Clerk as required in this Charter, the same shall thereupon be suspended from taking effect and the City Commission shall at its next regular session reconsider such ordinance and act thereon, and if the same be not entirely repealed, the City Commission shall submit such ordinance by the method hereinbefore provided for referendum or ordinances initiated by petition to the vote of the qualified electors of the city, either at the next regular municipal election or at a special election which may be called for that purpose at the discretion of the City Commission, and such ordinance shall not take effect unless a majority of the qualified electors voting thereon at such election shall vote in favor thereof.

The Recall of Elective Officials

§ 64. Any elective officer may be removed by the qualified electors of the city at the time and in the manner provided by the general laws of the State.

WESTNEDGE OVERPASS BANNER REQUESTS

Requests to hang banners on the South Westnedge overpass are approved by the City Clerk.

Requirements

  • Organizations making request must be non-profit
  • Event of advertisement must be of community-wide interest
  • Banner shall not exceed six feet by twenty feet in size
  • Banner shall not contain offensive or derogatory materials, symbols, or for-profit sponsors
  • General Liability Insurance including comprehensive and premises-operation. Minimum coverage includes:
  • Bodily Injury - $1,000,000 - occurrence/$1,000,000 - aggregate
  • Property Damage - $1,000,000 - occurrence/$1,000,000 - aggregate
  • City of Kalamazoo must be included as additional insured (and not merely as a certificate holder)
  • Many local sign companies already have a copy of this insurance on file
  • Time limits are as follows:
  • Both sides of overpass - up to 2 weeks only
  • One side of overpass - up to 4 weeks only
  • Fee of $50 per side, per week

Application Process

  • Check the calendar below to ensure the dates you want are available
  • Submit the completed  pdf  Westnedge Overpass Banner Application  (For best results use Adobe Reader)
  • Submit a copy of required insurance (many local sign companies already have a copy on file)
  • Submit a drawing, photo or printout of the proposed banner
  • Submit appropriate fee ($50 per side, per week)

Westnedge Pedestrian Overpass Rental Schedule

City Clerk's Staff

Scott A. Borling, CMC, City Clerk

Scott began his career with the City in August 2000 and was appointed as the City Clerk in April 2005. Prior to his current appointment he served as the Acting City Clerk, Deputy City Clerk, and Archives and Records Clerk. In 2008, Scott served on one of Secretary of State Terri Lynn Land's Election Modernization sub-committees.  Scott is a Certified Municipal Clerk (CMC) and holds an M.A. in medieval studies from Western Michigan University and a B.A. in history from Cedarville University. Scott is a member of the Michigan Association of Municipal Clerk's (MAMC), the International Institute of Michigan Clerks (IIMC), and the Association of Records Managers and Associates (ARMA).
 

Shelby Moss, Deputy City Clerk 

Shelby started with the City in March of 2012 as Deputy City Clerk.  She has a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Western Michigan University.  Shelby has over ten years of experience working for local government, including over six years of experience as a Deputy Clerk. Shelby is a member of the International Institute of Municipal Clerks (IIMC), Michigan Association of Municipal Clerks (MAMC) and subscribes to the publication Election Administration Reports.
 

Lisa Watkin, Election Specialist

Lisa returned to the City Clerk's Office in January 2007 as the Election Specialist.  From 2000 to 2005, Lisa was the part-time Election Clerk/Typist for the City of Kalamazoo.  Lisa has also worked in elections for Allegan County. 
 

Records Management, Research, and Archives

Austin Slack, City Records Coordinator

The Division of Records Management, Research and Archives manages and coordinates the life cycle of all City records. One important function of the Records Management Division is to provide public access to inactive and archival records. These include:

  • City Commission Minutes & Supporting Documentation 1918-present
  • City Council Minutes & Supporting Documentation 1884-1918
  • Village Council Minutes & Supporting Documentation 1843-1883
  • Building Plans, Permits, and Inspection Reports 1930-present
  • Aerial Photographs of the City of Kalamazoo from 1946, 1951, 1955
  • Annual Reports 1873-present
  • Annual Budgets 1919-present
  • Selected archival information from all departments
  • Sanborn Fire Co. and Chad Co. maps from 1902 and 1951
  • Photographic archives
  • Historical Resources

View Historic Photos in the Media Library   pdf  History of City Hall

FOOD TRUCKS

Mobile Food Vehicles (Food Trucks) are motorized vehicles engaged in the business of cooking, preparing and distributing food or beverage in public and private restricted spaces. Upon issuance of a license from the City Clerk's Office, Food Trucks may temporarily park upon a public street and engage in the service, sale or distribution of ready to eat food for individual portion service to the general public directly from the vehicle. This license is not for vehicles that move from place to place to dispense food and are stationary in the same location for no more than 15 minutes at a time, such as ice cream trucks.

To be considered for a Mobile Food Vendor License, the owner/operator must submit a complete application to the City Clerk's Office, which includes:

  • a completed Application for Mobile Food Vehicle License form
  • copies of all necessary licenses and permits issued by the Kalamazoo County Health Department
  • proof of General Comprehensive Liability insurance with limits of no less than $2 million Combined Single Limit coverage issued by an insurer licensed to do business in this state and which names the City and its agents, officials, and employees as an additional injured
  • proof of Public Liability and Property Damage motor vehicle policy with limits of no less than $1 million issued by an insurer licensed to do business in this State
  • payment of the $500 annual fee

For more information and an application form please view and/or print a  pdf  Food Truck Application Packet .

Click here to view the  pdf  Food Truck Ordinance .

Click here to view the  pdf  Commercial and Manufacturing Zoning Map . 

Mobile food vehicles shall not be parked within 150 feet of an existing, brick and mortar restaurant during the hours when such restaurant is open to the public for business. Click here to view the  pdf  Food Truck Downtown Restaurant Map .

 

Elections

The City of Kalamazoo Election Division within the City Clerk's Office is responsible for voter registration of all city residents and administration of all elections in compliance with federal, state, and local laws.  Our elections are run with honesty and integrity. We want everyone to have the opportunity to vote and to exercise that right.

The links below provide answers to common questions. If you don't find what you are looking for, please contact the City Clerk's Office.

General Information

Voter Information

Candidate Information

Pollworker Information

Initiative, Referendum, & Recall Information

Important Links

Licensing

The City Clerk's Office is responsible for various types of licensing. Read below for a description of those licenses and for fillable forms submittable with the appropriate fee.


Dance Hall License / Public Dance Permit

Dance Hall License

  • For facilities that host more than two public dances per year
  • Authorizes an unlimited number of events
  • Not transferable to another person or location
  • Valid for one year from the date of issuance
  • FEES: $300.00 for an initial one-year license; $100.00 for a license renewal

Public Dance Permit

  • For a specific event at facilities that host one or two dances per year
  • Not transferable from one person to another or one location to another.
  • FEES: $100.00 for the first dance permit issued; $50.00 for the second public dance held at the same facility within one year of the initial dance permit
  • Detailed information is included on the pdf  Public Dancehall and Public Dance Permit Application .

Fireworks Permits (Public Displays)

Anyone interested in a public firework display must obtain this license. Both forms need to be completed.


Going Out of Business License

Any business going out of business or leaving the City is required to have a Going Out of Business license.


Liquor License

Liquor Licenses are coordinated by Detective Brett Pittelkow in the Public Safety Department at 337-8142. All forms and fees should be submitted to the City Clerk.


Newspaper Vendor License

A Newspaper Vendor Licenses is require to operate any type of newspaper vending machine. 


Pawnbroker License

The Ordinance detailing Pawnbroker requirements can be found in Chapter 24 of the City of Kalamazoo Code of Ordinances


Peddler & Transient Merchant Licenses

Peddler License

Transient Merchant License

  • Outdoor Selling in one location on private property not owned by the vendor
  • Requires Zoning Board of Appeals approval for a variance
  • Requires a criminal background check
  • Fees: One week = $50; One month = $150; Six months = $300; One Year = $500
  • pdf  Transient Merchant License Application

More information is provided in this pdf  Peddler/Transient Merchant Informational Brochure .


Pool Table License

Any public business that charges for use of a pool table is required to obtain this license.


Precious Metals & Gems License

Any business that purchases precious metals and/or gems from customers.


Recycling Dealer License

View the Recycling Dealer Ordinance to see the requirements for this license.


Second Hand Dealer License

The Ordinance detailing Secondhand Dealer requirements can be found in Chapter 24 of the City of Kalamazoo Code of Ordinances.


Tag Day License

City ordinance states "no person shall solicit contributions or sell or offer for sale any tags, poppies, buttons, forget-me-nots, flags, ribbons or other like tokens for any charitable, patriotic or other purpose on the streets or in any public place in the City, without obtaining a permit for conducting the solicitation or sale involved.


Vehicle for Hire Business and/or Driver License

Defined as a service that provides transportation based on a per-mile charge.


Other Licenses

There are several other licenses not provided by the City. Below is a listing of where to obtain information for commonly requested licenses.

Noise Task Force

On February 18, 2013 the City Commission created the Downtown Noise Task Force. The primary purpose of the Task Force is to discuss the issue of late night noise in the downtown area and make recommendations to the City Commission.

Members

  • Martha Aills
  • Chris Falk
  • Grant Fletcher, Chair
  • Joby Hertel
  • Jon Hoadley
  • Gwen Lanier
  • Bob Lewis
  • Patti Owens
  • Margaret Strzelecki

Meeting Schedule

The next meeting of the Task Force will be on Monday, October 28, 2013 at 5:30 p.m. in the Community Room at City Hall

Documents Leading to the Establishment of the Task Force

pdf  Downtown Development Authority Minutes from September 17, 2012

pdf  Letter to Downtown Kalamazoo, Inc.  from downtown residents re: noise from downtown entertainment venues. Presented to the DDA on 9/17/2012.

pdf  February 18, 2013 City Commission Agenda Report  re: creation of the Downtown Noise Task Force and appointment of first members

pdf  City Commission minutes from February 18, 2013

Meeting Documents and Information by Meeting Date

May 13, 2013
May 1, 2013
April 9, 2013
June 10, 2013
June 24, 2013
July 29, 2013
August 12, 2013
October 28, 2013