PFAS Tests for Kalamazoo Municipal Drinking Water Show Results Within Safe Drinking Water Guidelines

Recent PFAS testing of water pumping stations serving the Kalamazoo municipal drinking water system have found results well within the safe drinking water guidelines of 70 parts per trillion (ppt) set by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Fifteen water pumping stations in the City of Kalamazoo Public Water Supply System were sampled on June 15, 2018. None of the tests revealed levels of PFOA/PFOS above the 70 ppt health advisory level. Of the 15 samples, 12 results were “non-detections,” and 3 stations had detectable levels below 70 ppt.

1 part per trillion is equal to roughly one drop of impurity per 16 million gallons of water, or per 24 Olympic-sized swimming pools.

All “baseload stations,” those which typically operate daily to provide water to customers, revealed no detection of PFOA/PFOS. The three stations at which low levels were detected are considered “peaking stations”.

The three “peaking stations” where low levels were detected will only be activated in case of emergency for fire response, system flushing, or in times of peak demand if other water stations cannot meet the demand.

Date
Sample ID
Station Type
PFOS + PFOA
Results (ppt)
PFOS + PFOA
LHA (ppt) Recommended Limit
6/15/18
TP201
Baseload
ND
70
6/15/18
TP303
Peaking
ND
70
6/15/18
TP304
Peaking
ND
70
6/15/18
TP305
Peaking
2
70
6/15/18
TP306
Peaking
ND
70
6/15/18
TP307
Baseload
ND
70
6/15/18
TP308
Baseload
ND
70
6/15/18
TP309
Baseload
ND
70
6/15/18
TP310
Peaking
ND
70
6/15/18
TP311
Peaking
18
70
6/15/18
TP312
Peaking
19
70
6/15/18
TP313
Peaking
ND
70
6/15/18
TP314
Baseload
ND
70
6/15/18
TP315
Baseload
ND
70
6/15/18
TP316
Baseload
ND
70

ND = the parameter was not detected based on laboratory’s analytical report

Kalamazoo municipal drinking water continues to be safe for human consumption, for pets, gardens, cooking, washing and all other regular uses.

These tests were conducted as part of a state-wide study of PFOA/PFOS levels in public water supplies by the Michigan PFAS Action Response Team (MPART). While these results do not indicate a public health concern, the City of Kalamazoo will follow directions from the State of Michigan regarding future monitoring of these chemicals. A second round of testing will occur within a month and wells will be tested quarterly.

About the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Lifetime Health Advisory Level

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has established a lifetime health advisory level for PFAS in drinking water. The level represents an amount of average daily exposure below which no harm is expected from these chemicals over the course of a person’s lifetime. This level is considered protective of everyone, including pregnant women, young children, and the elderly, and includes a 300% margin of safety.

About the Kalamazoo Municipal Water System

The Kalamazoo municipal water system serves over 100,000 regional citizens and hundreds of businesses in Kalamazoo County with water wells located throughout the county. The water system has a full-time staff of lab technicians who regularly test the drinking water for to ensure its safety and compliance with state and federal regulations. You can view the most recent water quality report here

If you have questions about your Kalamazoo municipal drinking water you may call (269) 337-8756. Additional information about PFAS can be found at www.michigan.gov/pfasresponse.

pdf Kalamazoo, WSSN03520, PFAS results (378 KB)

 

Public Hearing, Open Houses Set for Downtown Kalamazoo Economic Growth Authority

On July 2, the Kalamazoo City Commission adopted a resolution declaring its intent to create a corridor improvement authority which would be known as the Downtown Kalamazoo Economic Growth Authority (DEGA).

A public hearing on the adoption of a proposed resolution to create the DEGA and designate the qualified development area was set for Monday, August 6, 2018 at 7:00 PM at City Hall, 241 W. South St., Kalamazoo, MI 49007.

Since 1989, the Downtown Development Authority has funded the majority of its activities through tax increment revenues. In recent years, the values within the district for which those revenues are calculated and collected have plummeted. Similar to the City, the DDA was negatively impacted by the great recession, and due to constitutional constraints, has not recovered fully. Additionally, upon its creation, the values of the district were largely concentrated with one major industrial complex. Changes to that complex resulting from mergers and acquisitions have led to demolitions, transfers in ownership to tax-exempt entities, and assessment appeals. Due to these factors, the overall value of the district has fallen below the initial assessed value, eliminating the primary funding source of the DDA.

Over the last year, Downtown Kalamazoo Inc., on behalf of the Downtown Development Authority, and in partnership with the City Manager’s Office and the Community Planning and Economic Development Departments have explored multiple tools afforded by state Law to replace the DDA revenue shortfall.  Engagement with multiple outside consultants and State of Michigan’s economic development staff have led to the conclusion that the creation of the DEGA under the Corridor Improvement Authority Act of 2005 is the best solution to the current crisis faced by the DDA.

Act 280 of 2005 authorizes the governing body of a municipality to create corridor improvement authorities when certain qualifying criteria are met.  The intent in creating these authorities is to aid in the redevelopment of commercial corridors and qualified development areas to promote economic growth. The powers granted to a corridor improvement authority board are similar to those granted to the DDA and Brownfield Redevelopment Authority so as to be able to carry out the intent of the Act.

The activities of an authority are largely funded by proceeds from a tax increment financing (TIF) plan. As with the current DDA, corridor improvement authorities are also able to issue revenue bonds, accept donations, levy special assessments and receive fees/rentals from property and facilities operated or controlled by the authority. The creation of the DEGA will reset the basis on which tax increment revenues will be collected, placing the DEGA in a strong position to reinvest increased TIF revenue from recent and upcoming downtown developments.

The proposed boundaries of the DEGA largely mimic those of the existing Kalamazoo Downtown Development Authority, existing almost exclusively with the boundary of the Central Business District Neighborhood and so as to meet the definition of a qualified development area, the under the Act, necessarily includes the Kalamazoo Transit Center. Significantly the boundary excludes the aforementioned industrial parcels now owned by Zoetis. The proposed boundaries extend down Stadium Drive to Oliver Street allowing for investment in the southwest gateway into downtown. Also included are the commercial blocks of West Michigan Avenue and Academy Street between Westnedge Avenue and Stadium Drive. Lastly, the proposed boundary crosses the Kalamazoo River, to include the redevelopment site known as Merchant’s Crossing.

The creation of this corridor improvement authority is consistent with the goals of Imagine Kalamazoo 2025 and the Urban Growth Initiative, and will provide a much-needed source of revenue towards the development of downtown and ongoing infrastructure investment.

Meetings & Open Office Hours

The City of Kalamazoo and Downtown Kalamazoo Incorporated (DKI) invite members of the community to learn more about the proposed Kalamazoo Downtown Economic Growth Authority during two public meetings and open office hours in the months of July and August.

Public Meetings

  • Wednesday, July 25, 1 - 2:30 p.m. Kalamazoo Public Library, Central Library, Van Deusen Room (315 S. Rose St.)
  • Monday, July 30, 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. Anna Whitten Hall, First Floor Conference Room (202 N. Rose St.)

Neighborhood Meeting for Downtown Residents

  • Thursday, August 2, 6 - 7:30 p.m. Downtown Kalamazoo Inc. Office (162 E. Michigan Ave.)

Downtown Kalamazoo Inc. Open Office Hours

DKI staff members will be available to answer questions at DKI’s new office location, 162 E. Michigan Ave., during the following dates and times:

  • Tuesday, July 24, between 1 and 3 p.m.
  • Wednesday, July 25, between 2:30 and 4 p.m.
  • Thursday, July 26, between 1 and 3 p.m.
  • Tuesday, July 31, between 1 and 3 p.m.
  • Wednesday, Aug. 1, between 1 and 3 p.m.
  • Thursday, Aug. 2, between 1 and 3 p.m.

Two More 'Movies in the Parks' on Friday July 27, August 17

 

The 2018 summer Movies in the Parks series continues with two more chances to enjoy a movie outside, under the stars in one of our great city parks! All movies are free and everyone is invited! Family-friendly activities begin at 7 p.m. and continue until the movie starts at sunset. Popcorn and food will be available for purchase. The series is on select Fridays throughout the summer:

July 27, Coco at South Westnedge Park
Chosen by popular demand!

August 17, Sherlock Gnomes at Frays Park

The movies shown on July 13 and 27 were chosen by community members from a selection of films. You can RSVP to Movies in the Parks on Facebook here.

 

City of Kalamazoo

Home to the Kalamazoo Promise, three institutions of higher education, two nationally recognized healthcare systems, cutting-edge medical research, world-class brewing and dining, outstanding parks, and an extensive variety of music, art, theatre, and cultural attractions.

Contact

 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 (269) 337-8047
 (269) 337-8182
 241 West South Street
     Kalamazoo, MI 49007

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